Events

Event Series Penguin Cup Racing

Penguin Cup Racing

Jericho Sailing Centre 1300 Discovery St, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Our shoulder season racing series open to all Jericho style sail craft. Registration is required at jracing.org. Notice of Race: ...

Racing Awards and Volunteer Appreciation Dinner

Jericho Sailing Centre 1300 Discovery St, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

The annual JSCA Racing Awards and Volunteer Appreciation Dinner is Sunday, October 22 at 1700H. Tickets are $23 and available ...

$23

JSCA Annual Fleet Planning Meeting

Jericho Sailing Centre 1300 Discovery St, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

At this meeting, we review our previous year's events and preview our coming year's events, setting the dates for next ...

Jericho Paddling Club V1 8km Clinic and Race

Jericho Sailing Centre 1300 Discovery St, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Learn how to paddle a single person outrigger canoe without a rudder! Then race it 8km. Clinic time TBA Race ...

Rum Runner Regatta

Jericho Sailing Centre 1300 Discovery St, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

A two-day event hosted by the F18 fleet for high performance sailboats. Day one is a distance sailing event while ...

PNW ORCA small boat event

Jericho Sailing Centre 1300 Discovery St, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Pacific Northwest Outrigger Racing Canoe Association small boat event hosted by the Jericho Paddling Club at the Jericho Sailing Centre. ...

  • Common sense and consideration of fellow members help make the Jericho Sailing Centre a true community centre with a friendly salt water community atmosphere. Here are a few etiquette reminders to keep things sailing along smoothly: Do not leave your craft unattended on the shoreline for extended periods – share the shore.                    RAMPS, and the areas adjacent to launching ramps, are for craft launch/retrieval only. Do not rig, repair or otherwise loiter in this area.Do not leave or rig your craft in the rinsing areas adjacent to hosing stations.The Jericho Sailing Centre is a SMOKE/VAPE FREE facility. There is No Smoking/Vaping permitted in any Vancouver Park or beach area.Give pathway users the right of way and bear in mind they may be distracted and not aware that you are crossing the pathway with your craft or launch rope.Launch dollies are for launching/retrieval only (not for storage) and must be returned to the fence immediately after use.If you launch from your own dolly or trailer return it to your storage spot after launching.Do not use the winches unless you are familiar with their safe operation. Winch instruction is available from staff or Jericho Rescue Team members. Only members or registered guests may use winches & dollies.Only leashed, well behaved, non-barking/whining dogs are allowed in the compound. No dogs are allowed in the building or on the deck. Do not tie dogs to the base of stairwells or in other traffic areas. Do not leave your dog on shore while you are on the water. The City prohibits dogs on beaches. In consideration of other Jericho users please consider leaving your dog at home while visiting the Jericho Sailing Centre.Please coil hoses immediately after use and conserve water.Do not block aisle ways.Rinse racks are for rinsing not drying.Swimming is prohibited in front of the Jericho Sailing Centre.

  • Winter conditions can be challenging. Some people look forward to winter ocean recreation as a way to keep enjoying the salt water sports that they love. Over the years, Jericho Rescue has rescued people in the initial stages of hypothermia at all times of year. In winter, this is a risk people should be mitigating with proper preparation. Tim Murphy sails on a blustery, chilly day in mid January. Note the smaller ILCA 6 rig, drysuit and toque. Tim also made sure to stay close to shore in case something went awry. Upgrade your attirePlay safe and dress for survival. Now that the air and water temperatures have become noticeably cooler, the wetsuit or thermally protective attire that may have been optional in the summer months are now mandatory. It depends on your activity. If you are sailing or windsurfing then a cold water wetsuit is in order. A full length 4/3mm or thicker wetsuit with a proper hood or hat would be a minimum (a 5/4mm or thicker suit would be even warmer). Wetsuit manufacturers also offer accessory thermal layers to add warmth as conditions get colder. This is a great way to extend the usefulness of your regular suit. Some folks prefer drysuits – this time of year it would be important to make sure you are wearing proper insulating layers beneath your drysuit. In either case, check to make sure your suit is in good condition with no holes and that the seals are functioning properly. Heat loss from your head and/or neck should be addressed with a hood, hat and/or a neck tube. Neoprene booties, gloves or mittens are also a good idea. If paddling or rowing, its a good idea to add insulating and/or wind-blocking layers to a dry bag in the bottom of your boat. This way you can layer up and down as you cycle through work and recovery intervals during your workout or if you end up getting wetter than expected. It’s important that these layers work well when wet and do not absorb water – wool and synthetics are recommended. Be smart about your activity patternsSailing, paddling or rowing in the cold means being smart about your route and preparation. Mitigate your chances of being caught out in the cold by doing more laps closer to home instead of forging further from shore. If windy, make your way upwind first to protect against getting caught downwind should something go wrong. Be conservative with your gear choices, skill and endurance levels. The cold combined with extra attire always makes activity a little more difficult and the consequences of gear or skill failure are more dangerous. Choose a smaller sail, or a more seaworthy kayak than you might choose in similar conditions during the summer. Resist the urge for “one more reach” and make sure you’re on shore before you get tired or before the cold reduces your ability to operate your craft competently. These UBC Sailing Club kayakers are well equipped for winter paddling. Note the safety gear on deck, drysuits, neoprene hoods, a calm day and a buddy to paddle with. If you do fall into ice cold water unprepared, your body will cool off more quickly than it can generate heat. The 1-10-1 rule states that after a minute of fast breathing and panic, you’ll only have about 10 minutes or so of coordinated gross motor strength and function and one hour of consciousness. Plan your route so that you can quickly return to shore should you get colder than expected during your activity. However, if you cannot manage to re-board your craft after a capsize, always stay with your craft – it is far easier to spot than a person in the water. Have a plan to call for help if you need it.The law requires a sound signalling device, but a whistle or horn is no good if no one is on the water to hear it. If you do venture further from shore be prepared with a way to call for help. A cell phone in a waterproof case or a VHF marine radio (as long as you are licensed to operate it) are good items to bring with you. Safety in numbersUse the Buddy System. Always sail, paddle, or row with someone else, especially in cold water conditions. Let a reliable friend or relative know when and where you are going and when you expect to return. Diligently contact them upon your safe return. For more information on cold water survival surf on over to Cold Water Bootcamp.

  • On the ocean there are elements of risk that common sense and personal awareness can help reduce. Regardless of how you decide to use the ocean always show courtesy to others. Please adhere to the code listed below and share with others the responsibility for a safe ocean experience.  It is every member’s responsibility to know and observe the rules of the road when on or near the water. Here are some key rules which every Jericho member must know and practice.0.5 IT IS EVERYONE’S RESPONSIBILITY TO AVOID A COLLISION 1. Always wear your P.F.D. on the water.2. Sail powered craft have the right of way over power craft, paddle and rowing powered craft.3. All non-commercial vessels shall keep well clear of commercial vessels.4. It is illegal and extremely dangerous to pass between a tug and it’s tow.5. A port tack sailing vessel shall keep clear of a starboard tack vessel.6. A windward vessel shall keep clear of a leeward vessel.7. A vessel clear astern shall keep clear of a vessel ahead.8. Any vessel overtaking another shall keep clear.9. A vessel tacking or gybing shall keep clear of a vessel on a tack.10. The area south of the orange can buoys is for training or transiting only.11. Swimming or wading on the beach in front of the Centre is prohibited and is particularly dangerous for small children.12. It is unsafe to loiter or let children play near the bottom of launching ramps.13. Stay well clear of the end of the Jericho Pier as fishers cast lines as far as possible.14. Be cautious of pathway traffic when launching/retrieving.15. Do not leave your craft on the shoreline for extended periods of time. Common sense goes a long way toward maintaining a safe environment. Membership in the Jericho Sailing Centre Association is contingent on members knowing and observing the Safe Ocean Sailing rules.